Healthcare

Healthcare Colour Code Warning Systems

I love feedback from the Firewize website. Not a day goes by when I don't get a message about something that we have written, or a request for more information. Today I received a message from a consultant (Tash) who asked for more information about an older article on the website titled "Healthcare - Colour Code Warning System" . Here is the question, and my response:

---------- Original Message ----------
From: Tash

Fire Safety in Victoria's Hospitals

Public Hospitals in Victoria are responsible for ensuring that laws relating to fire protection, health, and general safety are observed for any premises from which the Hospital operates irrespective of whether the relevant regulatory requirements place the obligation upon the owner or occupier of those premises.

Laundry fires - how to reduce the risk!

Regularly we hear of fires in commercial laundry's, usually in a hospital or nursing home. Commonly the laundry is protected by a Type B heat detector however there are simple steps we can take to reduce or eliminate the causes of fire in these areas.

Just in the last month alone, Google News reported there were 423 hits on laundry related fires....

Healthcare - Colour Code Warning System

A recognised standard within healthcare facilities in Australia is the colour coded emergency response system. This system forms part of healthcare facilities Emergency Procedures Manual (EPM). Each colour helps define the actions and activities required of staff when responding and managing an incident.

"Service is second to none..."

"I have found the service provided by Maintenance Essentials most professional. When a problem is reported on our fire indicator panel, their attention and level of service is second to none. I have been in the hospital industry for over 29 years, and can honestly say this company would be the one I would recommend."

Jeff Whittington
Facilities Officer
Infrastructure Aged Care & Rehabilitation
Melbourne Extended Care and Rehabilitation Service